Day 22 – Quantified Self

It has been a few days and I have some Zeo data to share.

It helped me almost immediately identify a problem with my core sleep. I had assumed the reason I felt so rough in the mornings was part of the adaption process, however the Zeo showed that I was trying to wake up during a deep sleep. Digging back through my sleep log helped me identify my ultradian rhythm and move the core sleep back into alignment with my body clock. The next day I felt perfectly fine.



The graphs show that I am getting between 60-80 minutes of both REM and SWS during my core sleeping hours (see below). The body requires 90 minutes of each and I appear to be making the remainder up during the nap time. This demonstrates that not only has my body adapted (I have a compressed sleep cycle that minimises light sleep) but that I am also getting a healthy amount of the right kind of sleep.

Unfortunately the Zeo does not upload the data for my naps, so I have to check this manually after each one.

By sheer serendipity, I was prompted towards a “Quantified Self” (QS) group that meets at the Google campus in Shoreditch last week. I had not heard the term before but it turns out there are other strange people in the work with my same obsession for measuring and experimenting with your life.

Encouraged by some of the talks I have started using fitbit to track my activity levels, food that I eat, weight and so on. Interestingly, the Fitbit pedometer can be used to monitor your sleep quality by strapping it to your wrist. The body makes different movements during different phases of sleep. I am sceptical as to how accurate this is but I may try it and compare it against the Zeo data just to see.

As an aside, it occurred to me that the evidence for a technological singularity would be observable and even could be brought about through QS culture. Although I suspect the transhumanists will be disappointed for some time to come. Just a thought.

Now I am left wondering what other parts of my life I can instrument ;)

h+

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